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Category: WordPress

Responsive Design and WordPress

This year we have seen the dawning of the responsive design craze amongst web designers and developers. I remained skeptical about the trend, primarily because I was raised in the world of good usability and accessibility, and breakpoints and adaptive images seemed incongruous and presumptuous with the foundations of those schools of thought. While responsive design proponents like to say that multi-device adaptation is providing good usability, I disagree.

Relating to my favorite CMS, WordPress, the whole responsive design trend has rubbed me in even more wrong ways. I’ve watched designer after designer dive into responsive WordPress themes, and I’ve even tried using a few myself, only to leave me wondering…why?

This article has some great analyses on this exact topic, and it provides some good food for thought in regards to responsive design and WordPress. From the article:

My biggest issue with responsive design is that it is a reactive client-side approach which, in the context of a server-side content management system like WordPress, seems completely unnecessary.

What are your thoughts on responsive design and WordPress?

WordPress Pingback Vulnerability

An older vulnerability that got ignored in 2007 is showing up again.

According to Acunetix’s Bogdan Calin, this particular vulnerability is exploitable through the platform’s XMLRPC API (through XMLRPC.PHP). Attackers could try and guess hosts inside each network they target, port scan those hosts, reconfigure internal routers and launch large scale DDoS attacks.

Mas aqui.

From the details it doesn’t sound extremely dangerous, but something that should be fixed sooner rather than later. You can bet that we will see WordPress 3.5.1 pretty darned soon!

The Links menu in WordPress 3.5 didn’t actually go away

In the lead-up to the 3.5 release of WordPress, we kept hearing that the outdated “blogroll” was going to go away. No longer would you see the Links menu in your WordPress admin area because it was no longer really needed with the advent of custom menus last year.

So after I updated many sites to 3.5, I noticed the Links menu was still there.

Turns out it only goes away on new installations. Bleh. In case you were wondering, that is why you still see it.

Dear WordPress Theme Developers

For the love of humanity, please quit adding SEO ‘optimization’ into your custom WordPress theme options. Don’t assume we want to use your restrictive interpretation of what is best for our website.

Love,

People who know what they are doing.

Failed WordPress Upgrade

The error message:

Fatal error: Call to undefined function update_core()

The Cause:

You don’t have enough disk space on your hosting account anymore.

The Fix:

Pick one:

  • Ask your web host to bump up your allowed disk space
  • Delete unneeded files on your account
  • Move to a new web host

Conclusion

I never ran into this problem before, but during an update to WordPress 3.4, the error kept appearing every time the upgrade script tried to unpack the downloaded zip file from wordpress.org.  It would be helpful if they included a message about it to let you know you may be out of space, but at least you can Google the error and find this page now 🙂